The Green Rose

Is there a pot of gold for us lovers of roses? For all the Irish in all of us and lovers of roses, let us think green, not a shamrock but a green rose. Not St. Patrick rose which only has a tint of green, but a real Green Rose.

 The Green Rose

 

At one of the meetings of the Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society, I won a unique rose called Viridiflora ‘Rosa Monstrosa’, otherwise known as Green Rose. Records say Green Rose has been in cultivation as early as 1743 and is a sport from Rosa Indica (The China Rose of England and the Daily Rose of America).

 

The Green Rose is a small plant that grows to 3’ tall and has few thorns. It can be grown in a pot, and is rarely out of “blooms”. The buds are small, oval, of soft bluish green color but unless you know what you’re looking for, it is hard to find the bud since the bush is totally green. The “blooms” are usually formed in clusters continually throughout the season and look wonderful. The petals of the bloom revert back to leaves (petals are modified leaves). The bloom does not have reproductive organs. As you would expect from an Old Garden Rose, Green Rose is fragrant too. It has a spicy fragrance. The Green Rose is an oddity and people either love it or hate it.

 

So for rose lovers, take pride. We have our own green to celebrate. It is a wonderful rose to use as a filler material in arrangements or as a landscape rose. But I’m sure some visitors to your garden will undoubtedly say “That’s not a rose.  You got to be kidding.” or worst yet, “That is the ugliest flower I’ve ever seen. Why do you give it space?” Because it is a great conversation piece to say the least. Plant it and you might like it. It is worth a try. Just as when you present your friend with a perfect red rose and they ask “Is that real?” I bet you this same person will tell you this rose is not real. But it is a real rose. The Green Rose is just that, a green rose.

 

“May the sun shine warm upon your face

And

May the rains fall softly upon your rose beds.”

 

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!!!

 

Contrary to popular belief, roses are not that difficult to grow. Why do you think Roses have been around for millions of years?  All they need are food, water and sunlight.  Just like you and me. If you supply their basic needs, you’ll be rewarded with beautiful and fragrant flowers like the Green Rose. Unlike other plants that only bloom once a year like azaleas, roses bloom all season long. If you keep on pruning them, you’ll get another bloom in 5-6 weeks.

If you have any questions on roses, ask the Rose Gardening World group on Facebook, they will share their rose knowledge with you. Here is the link:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/128765990560518/

Happy Rose Gardening!!! 

YES, YOU CAN grow beautiful roses!

So you want to grow beautiful roses but can you do it? The resounding answer is

YES, YOU CAN grow beautiful roses!  

If you follow the following Basic Rose Culture, you’ll be on your way to have beautiful roses in your garden:

  • Buy only strong healthy plants. Buy your roses from reliable sources.
  • Rose needs a minimum of 4 hours of sunlight, lots of drainage and away from tree roots.
  • Before you start planting, do a soil test. The ideal pH for roses is 6.0 – 6.5.
  • Dig a hole at least 18” deep and 18” in diameter. Mix soil 1/3 organic matter (peat moss) with 2/3 soil from the hole. Put a handful of Epsom salt, a banana peel and a handful of superphospate in the hole.
  • Space rose bushes at least 3 ft apart for good air circulation for hybrid teas and floribundas. English roses and other shrub roses should be spaced at least 4 ft apart.
  • Roses need about 1 to 1 ½” of water a week so water more often during the hot spell in the summer. If rain is lacking, water twice a week. Reduce watering in the fall but do not let your rose bushes enter winter under stressful condition.
  • Mulch is important since it keeps out weeds, conserves moisture and protects the roots from fluctuations in temperature.
  • Rose is a heavy feeder. Use plenty of organic fertilizer. Supplement with chemical fertilizer. Apply Bayer 3 in 1 fertilizer in early spring. Six weeks before the first fall frost, stop the fertilization program.
  • Deadhead as soon as the bloom is finished. Pruning controls the size and shape and keeps the roses blooming all season long.
  • Spray horticultural oil in late winter thru to late spring to keep blackspot in check.
  • Keep the rose beds clean to discourage diseases and insects.