A Red, Red Rose for Valentine’s Day

A Red, Red Rose

By Robert Burns (1759-1796)

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O, my Luve’s like a red, red rose,

That’s newly sprung in June.

O, my Luve’s like a melodie

That’ sweetly play’d in tune.

 

As fair as thou, my bonnie lass,

So deep in love am I;

And I will love thee still, my dear,

Till a’ the seas gang dry.

 

HAPPY VALENTINE’S DAY

 

Until next time. Stop and Smell the Roses.

Rosalinda, The Rose Lady

 

 

Time To Prune Your Roses

If you look at the calendar, Spring begins on March 20 but for lovers of roses, spring comes when that yellow-flowered shrub called Forsythia starts to bloom.  Pruning roses is a rite of spring for rosarians. In the South, I was told to prune on the last week in February. Then our season begins.  Some rosarians start early which is not such a bad idea especially if you have plenty of roses to prune.   You can always cut more later but you have a head start.

We prune our roses for several reasons – to keep our roses healthy, to control its excessive growth and to shape the bush for a better display.

Before we rush out there in the garden, make sure you have all the right equipment.  A good pair of bypass pruner preferably Felco. No 2 is recommended. Keep your pruner very sharp.  A sharp pruner is less taxing to your hand and creates less bruising on your roses.  For cutting larger canes, a lopper is a better choice.  Their longer handles make it easier to cut through thicker canes.  You should also have a pruning saw for those extra thick canes.

Also, of utmost importance is to wear gloves.  A good leather glove is a must to protect yourself from too many scratches.  Long sleeved shirts or jackets will protect your arms and wrists.  Hat is also important to protect your face from the sun and to protect your head if you are balding.  Make sure your tetanus booster shot is up to date.

Your first agenda is to cut the dead, diseased and damaged canes. Cut until you see the white or cream colored pith.  If necessary, you can go down to almost near the bud union.  Roses will bloom on a dark colored pith but once the weather warms, the canes die back or become unproductive. Don’t go crazy looking for white pith on “Peace” rose.  It does not have white pith.  After getting rid of the dead and diseased canes, begin cutting the longer canes first and get them out of your way.  Pay close attention to what you are doing.  Work from the outside in.  Remember that you are surrounded with thorns so be very careful.

Cut above the leaf with five leaflets to about ¼ inch from the bud.  If longer, the cane can die back and if shorter, new growth might break off in the wind.  Cut to an outward facing bud so a new growth will face outward too.  With few exception, like roses that tend to grow sideways, cut in the direction you want the branch to grow.  Roses like The McCartney Rose, First Prize and Just Joey tend to sprawl so prune them to an inside facing bud.    Always remember to aim at an open space in the bush.  Make the cut on a slant so water drains off.  Seal with Elmer’s glue to prevent the cane borer from burrowing into the newly cut canes.

You also want to open the center of the bush for good air circulation to ward off diseases.  Cut long and straggly canes and canes that are crossing or touching each other leaving the stronger canes.  Leave three or four good healthy canes.  If only one cane is available, cut it lower to encourage new growth from the bud union.

On Hybrid Teas, Grandiflora, and some Floribundas, remove stems smaller than a pencil because they will not produce good blooms for cutting.  For exhibitors, cutting back to 6 to 12 inches length will produce stronger canes and good quality blooms.  Miniature roses are pruned the same way as Hybrid Teas.  If you find this too tedious, you can go drastic and use a hedge pruner and prune to 5” high.  Mother Nature is very forgiving and usually corrects our mistakes so don’t worry too much.

Remove all blind shoots.  These are branches that taper down to almost nothing.  Remove spurs.  These are short growths only a few inches long that have hardened off and taper down to a point.  They will not flower.

Prune to desired height you want for your rose.  Some rosarians want their roses tall.  I want my roses short and compact looking so I can look down on them instead of stretching my neck to appreciate their beauty. I usually cut to about a foot high except for the shrub types which can go from 18 inches to 24 inches tall.

After you are done pruning, remove every leaf.  These old leaves are the reservoir for black spot and mildew.  You might also want to start your spraying program with dormant oil to take care of the overwintering insects.  Also, spread a cupful of Epsom salt around each bush for better growth.  Then you can relax a little bit while waiting for the new growth to arrive.

Before and After Pruning

Rose Bush Before and After Puning.

 

Until next time. Stop and Smell the Roses.

Rosalinda, The Rose Lady

 

Rosalinda R Morgan

Author and Garden Writer

 

 

 

FIREFIGHTER

FIREFIGHTER

Firefighter photo

Hyrbridizer: Orard, 1999

Var: ORAdal, Hacienda, Red ‘n’ Fragrant

Firefighter is a beautiful dark red hybrid tea which is the first of the nine roses to be named for the Remember Me Rose Gardens to honor the 343 firefighters who died on September 11, 2001 while trying to save lives in the World Trade Center. Firefighter also honors those men and women who risk their lives daily to protect ours.

Firefighter is a tall hybrid tea about 5-6 ft tall with a perfect flower form, about 4-6 inches and disease resistant. Petal count is about 40-45 and has a very strong fragrance. Firefighter won the City of Portland Gold Medal Award for 2007. I planted two Firefighter rose bushes, one on each side of my walkway and when they are in bloom, you can smell the sweet fragrance as you walk by. Right now, they are about 5 ft tall and full of blooms.

To honor and pay tribute to all the victims of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, an organization was formed by Sue Casey of Portland, Oregon to create three rose gardens on or near the sites of the terrorist attacks in New York, at the Pentagon and at a field in Stonycreek Township, Somerset County in Pennsylvania.

Signature

Signature

Signature

Photo courtesy of Bob Sabin

Hybrid Tea

Var: JACnor

Hybridizer: Warriner

            ‘Signature’ is one of the top ten exhibition roses in the country since its introduction in 1996.  Its huge, high-centered blooms, 5 to 6 inches in diameter on a long stems about 18 inches long make it the favorite of exhibitors across the country.  The intense coloration of the bloom which is deep pink with cream at the bottom of the petals looks stunning.  It has sharply pointed buds which open into perfectly formed rose of 30 to 40 petals count, complemented with dark, thick leathery foliage.  Except for the fact that it has very light fragrance, it could be the rose you’ve been waiting for the exhibition table and garden display.  Plant it in the garden in a group of three with some blue perennial like salvia or dephinum and the effect is quite dazzling.

The McCartney Rose

The McCartney Rose

(‘Nirvana’ x ‘Papa Meilland’) x ‘First Prize’

Hybridizer – Meilland, France, 1991

This heavily scented rose was originally named for Paul McCartney of “The Beatles” but Paul wanted it to be named in honor of his entire family whose favourite flower is the Rose.

The bloom is a very deep pink, starts high centered and then cupped as they mature. The blooms repeat very well all through the summer and into autumn. Its petal count is about 40. It has very dark, large and glossy leaves. It is a very vigorous plant and tall – reaching about 6- 7 ft. If left untamed, it will encroach on the neighboring plant – the canes grow sideways. The best place to grow it is in the corner of a bed where it can have more elbow room. “The McCartney Rose” is a very disease resistant rose and has a strong fragrance. Below are some of its awards:

  • Bagatelle Fragrance Prize 1988
  • Geneva Gold Medal 1988
  • Madrid Fragrance Prize 1988
  • Monza Gold Medal and Fragrance Prize 1988
  • Paris Gold Medal 1988
  • Belfast Fragrance Prize 1993
  • Durbanville Fragrance Prize 1993
  • Paris Fragrance Prize 1993

Fragrant Cloud

Fragrant Cloud by Jan Haught Bingham

Rose Photo Courtesy of Jan Haught Bingham, member of Rose Gardening World.

Fragrant Cloud

Registered Name – TANellis

Syns. Duftwolke, Nuage Parfume

Tantau, Germany, 1967

Seedling x ‘Prima Ballerina’

Fragrant Cloud rose has extremely fragrant blooms and constantly winning at rose shows across the country for its fragrance. The flowers are an unusual coral-red maturing to geranium red with 30 petals and exhibition-style blooms. The high-centered blooms are borne mostly singly, averaging 5” in diameter on a vigorous upright plant of 3-5 ft in height and 2 ft in width. The large foliage is a rich, glossy dark green on a vigorous bush that is very prolific. I had Fragrant Cloud rose in my first garden in the early ‘70s and then again it was one of the first roses that were planted when we bought our next home in the ‘80s. After 30 years, it was still there when we left.

Fragrant Cloud rose is an excellent rose for bedding and for borders and cut flower. It is very susceptible to mildew in autumn and black spot during damp weather. Inspite of those problems, it still remains as one of the most popular roses in the market because of its intense fragrance. There is a climbing Fragrant Cloud propagated by Collin & Sons in England in 1973. It also has that unique coral-red bloom on the long canes, covered with dark, reddish green foliage. The climbing version can reach a height of 12 ft. Fragrant Cloud climbing rose can produce very fragrant blooms during the summer only.

Fragrant Cloud rose has won the National Rose Society President’s International Trophy in 1964, Portland Gold Medal in 1966, James Alexander Gamble for Fragrance Award in 1970 and World Favorite Rose in 1981 and still winning awards today for fragrance.

Peace

Peace 1

Peace

Parentage: (‘George Dickson’ x ‘Souvenir de Claudius Pernet’) x (‘Joanna Hill’ x ‘Chas. P. Kilham’) x ‘Margaret McGredy’.

Hybridized by the French hybridizer Francis Meilland in the late 1930s, and introduced by Conard-Pyle Co., West Grove, PA in 1945.

 

The rose that is called ‘Peace’ in the United States and Great Britain is called ‘Mme Antoine Meilland’ in France, ‘Gioia’ (Joy) in Italy and ‘Gloria Dei’ (The Glory of God) in Germany. ‘Peace’ is one of the most famous roses of the century if not of all times. It is one of the few modern roses surrounded by legend and myth. It was bred by Francis Meilland under the code name 3-35-40 and named it Madame A. Meilland, after his mother. Francis Meilland hybridized another lemon yellow rose with ‘Peace’ as the parent and named her Grand’mere Jenny, after his paternal grandmother.

One story goes that it was hybridized in France in the last years before World War II, and escaped as unnamed cuttings in the last American diplomatic bag to leave Paris as World War II began. Recognized as a winner, the rose was propagated by Conard-Pyle Co., a leading American rose nursery and released in 1945. Because it returned in peacetime to a liberated France, ‘Peace’ was the name the rose was given. Later, the ‘Peace’ rose took the world by storm after being the centerpiece on all the tables at the organizational meeting of the United Nations at San Francisco in 1945.

Another version of the story of ‘Peace’ is that it began in France when the Nazi invasion forced young Francis Meilland to smuggle three one-pound packages of an experimental rose into other countries. Two of the packages were confiscated, but the third made it to Robert Pyle of Conard-Pyle Co. in the United States. Ten years later, after this rose of outstanding character and quality had been tested throughout the United States, the ARS planned a special name-giving ceremony. At the Pacific Rose Society Exhibition in Pasadena, CA, Robert Pyle declared “We are persuaded that this greatest new rose of our time should be named for the world’s greatest desire – Peace.” Francis Meilland’s rose was given its American and English name ‘Peace’ on April 29, 1945, the day Berlin fell to the allies.

Nine years after introduction, an American authority estimated that some thirty million ‘Peace’ were growing in gardens around the world. Nowadays, nobody seems to have kept count. With all the royalties coming from the sale of ‘Peace’, the Meillands were able to build a rose hybridizing empire on the Cap d’Antibes on the Mediterranean shores.

The day the war with Japan ended, ‘Peace’ was given the All American Rose Selection Award. A month later, the day the peace treaty was signed with Japan, ‘Peace’ received the American Rose Society’s supreme Award, the Gold Medal. ‘Peace’ has won most of the world’s top rose awards: Gold Medal, Portland 1944, All-American Rose Selection 1946, Gold Medal Certificate, American Rose Society 1947, Golden Rose, The Hague 1965, Hall of Fame, World Federation of Rose Societies 1976, Award of Garden Merit, Royal Horticultural Society 1993. Today, ‘Peace’ is still the world’s favorite rose.

Another melodramatic story, so often told, is that the budwood of ‘Peace’ was smuggled out of the south of France by a heroic U.S. embassy official in November 1942, just hours before the German invasion. It’s a very good story, but the truth of the matter according to Francis Meilland, is that the budwood was sent to Germany, Italy and the United States via ordinary postal channels in the summer of 1939. Southern France at that time was not yet invaded. It was perfect timing. By receiving a few cuttings in 1939, Conard-Pyle was able to introduce this rose at the San Francisco conference to found the United Nations, the day Berlin fell in 1945. If these cuttings were received in November 1942 they could not have started budding until 1943, and they could not have built up enough stock of this rose in time for nationwide distribution three years later.

‘Peace’ has creamy yellow, pink-edged petals with beautiful deep green foliage. Buds are high-centered and cupped at opening. Blooms are double (40 to 45 petals), 5 to 6 inches across, near perfect in form and more or less continuous flowering throughout the season. It is a good exhibition rose and an excellent cut flower. It’s rated 8.0 on the 2015 Handbook for Selecting Roses. Vita Sackville-West hated it and thought it horribly coarse.

‘Peace’ is a vigorous, bushy, upright plant, 4-5 ft. tall with stiff canes covered with large, leathery, dark green, glossy foliage with good disease-resistant quality. New growth appears light red. ‘Peace’ resents heavy pruning. Colors vary from day to day but are essentially golden yellow edged in rose pink. Flowers were huge in 1940s. Somehow ‘Peace’ planted in the 1940s and still thriving today at a well-maintained public gardens, war memorials, or at the homes of veteran gardeners are larger compared to the blooms on the ‘Peace’ plant you will receive from any nursery today. Even if genetic science tells you otherwise, still the ‘Peace’ sold today is just a pale imitation of the old ‘Peace’.

Hybrid teas bred since the 1950s often have at least a little ‘Peace’ blood in them. Of the many mutations of ‘Peace’ introduced over the years, the most popular is ‘Chicago Peace’. Other sports of ‘Peace’ are ‘Berlin’, ‘Garden Party’, ‘Gold Crown’, ‘Glowing Peace’, ‘Love and Peace’ (2002 AARS Selection), ‘Perfume Delight’, ‘Pink Rose’, ‘Princesse de Monaco’, ‘Royal Highness’, ‘Speaker Sun’, ‘Sterling Silver’, and ‘Tropicana’. A Climbing form was introduced in 1950. ‘Climbing Peace’ is a climbing sport of ‘Peace’. It has shiny, deep green, almost-leathery foliage, and it has a very pleasing color, peachy pink suffused with apricot yellow. Its buds are exquisitely pointed, and they open into large, long-lasting flowers. It is so robust and healthy that you never have to spray it with pesticides. Its one real flaw is a complete lack of fragrance.

‘Peace’ is showcased at the following Display Gardens: Sturgeon Memorial Rose Garden, Largo, FL; Atlanta Botanical Garden, Atlanta, GA; Julia Davis Rose Garden, Boise, ID; George L. Luthy Memorial Rose Garden, Peoria, IL; Richmond Rose Garden, Richmond, IN; City of Portland Rose Circle, Portland, ME; The Jim Buck Ross Rose Garden, Jackson, MS; Norfolk Botanical Garden, Norfolk, VA.