Proven Products for Rose Gardeners

Veterans' Honor 2

If you are looking for some great products for rose gardeners, here are some that have undergone extensive testing by ARS members and found to be of high quality:

 

  • Bayer Advanced All-in-One Rose and Flower care
  • Garden Safe Brand Rose and Flower Insect Killer
  • Mills Easy Feed 20-10-6
  • Mills Magic Rose Mix
  • Miracle-Gro Garden Soil for Roses
  • Miracle-Gro Water Soluble Plant Food

 

Other products that I have used and recommend highly:

 

Until Next time. Stop and Smell the Roses

Rosalinda R Morgan

Author & Garden Writer

Abraham Darby

 

abraham-darby

Photo from David Austin Roses

Auscot – David Austin 1985

 

Abraham Darby is one of the most vigorous of all David Austin Roses.  Having heard from fellow rosarians that it bears long arching canes, I decided to plant it along a fence on the west side of my property in New York and let it spread out.  Abraham Darby is a well-rounded shrub which bears numerous, very large 5” across, very full (41+ petals), cluster-flowered, in small clusters, old fashioned, quartered bloom form, double cup-shaped flowers in shades of apricot becoming tinted with pink as they age.  Few roses make such a fine display or produce such magnificent blooms with glossy green foliage all through the season.  To encourage a better crop of flowers and help maintain its compact form, summer pruning is recommended.  The growth is vigorous and reliable and it repeats well.  Height is 5 ft. x 5 ft. or 8 ft. as a climber.

 

Abraham Darby is an outstanding rose with disease resistance, very prolific and continually blooming throughout the season.  I planted a pink clematis next to it and they complemented very nicely.  It has a rich, fruity fragrance with a refreshing sharpness.  Abraham Darby is named after one of the founding figures of the Industrial Revolution, who lived in Shropshire.

 

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.

Rosalinda Morgan, The Rose Lady

Author of “The Wentworth Legacy”

www.rosalindarmorgan.com

 

 

The Green Rose

Is there a pot of gold for us lovers of roses? For all the Irish in all of us and lovers of roses, let us think green, not a shamrock but a green rose. Not St. Patrick rose which only has a tint of green, but a real Green Rose.

 The Green Rose

 

At one of the meetings of the Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society, I won a unique rose called Viridiflora ‘Rosa Monstrosa’, otherwise known as Green Rose. Records say Green Rose has been in cultivation as early as 1743 and is a sport from Rosa Indica (The China Rose of England and the Daily Rose of America).

 

The Green Rose is a small plant that grows to 3’ tall and has few thorns. It can be grown in a pot, and is rarely out of “blooms”. The buds are small, oval, of soft bluish green color but unless you know what you’re looking for, it is hard to find the bud since the bush is totally green. The “blooms” are usually formed in clusters continually throughout the season and look wonderful. The petals of the bloom revert back to leaves (petals are modified leaves). The bloom does not have reproductive organs. As you would expect from an Old Garden Rose, Green Rose is fragrant too. It has a spicy fragrance. The Green Rose is an oddity and people either love it or hate it.

 

So for rose lovers, take pride. We have our own green to celebrate. It is a wonderful rose to use as a filler material in arrangements or as a landscape rose. But I’m sure some visitors to your garden will undoubtedly say “That’s not a rose.  You got to be kidding.” or worst yet, “That is the ugliest flower I’ve ever seen. Why do you give it space?” Because it is a great conversation piece to say the least. Plant it and you might like it. It is worth a try. Just as when you present your friend with a perfect red rose and they ask “Is that real?” I bet you this same person will tell you this rose is not real. But it is a real rose. The Green Rose is just that, a green rose.

 

“May the sun shine warm upon your face

And

May the rains fall softly upon your rose beds.”

 

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!!!

 

Contrary to popular belief, roses are not that difficult to grow. Why do you think Roses have been around for millions of years?  All they need are food, water and sunlight.  Just like you and me. If you supply their basic needs, you’ll be rewarded with beautiful and fragrant flowers like the Green Rose. Unlike other plants that only bloom once a year like azaleas, roses bloom all season long. If you keep on pruning them, you’ll get another bloom in 5-6 weeks.

If you have any questions on roses, ask the Rose Gardening World group on Facebook, they will share their rose knowledge with you. Here is the link:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/128765990560518/

Happy Rose Gardening!!! 

Time To Prune Your Roses

If you look at the calendar, Spring begins on March 20 but for lovers of roses, spring comes when that yellow-flowered shrub called Forsythia starts to bloom.  Pruning roses is a rite of spring for rosarians. In the South, I was told to prune on the last week in February. Then our season begins.  Some rosarians start early which is not such a bad idea especially if you have plenty of roses to prune.   You can always cut more later but you have a head start.

We prune our roses for several reasons – to keep our roses healthy, to control its excessive growth and to shape the bush for a better display.

Before we rush out there in the garden, make sure you have all the right equipment.  A good pair of bypass pruner preferably Felco. No 2 is recommended. Keep your pruner very sharp.  A sharp pruner is less taxing to your hand and creates less bruising on your roses.  For cutting larger canes, a lopper is a better choice.  Their longer handles make it easier to cut through thicker canes.  You should also have a pruning saw for those extra thick canes.

Also, of utmost importance is to wear gloves.  A good leather glove is a must to protect yourself from too many scratches.  Long sleeved shirts or jackets will protect your arms and wrists.  Hat is also important to protect your face from the sun and to protect your head if you are balding.  Make sure your tetanus booster shot is up to date.

Your first agenda is to cut the dead, diseased and damaged canes. Cut until you see the white or cream colored pith.  If necessary, you can go down to almost near the bud union.  Roses will bloom on a dark colored pith but once the weather warms, the canes die back or become unproductive. Don’t go crazy looking for white pith on “Peace” rose.  It does not have white pith.  After getting rid of the dead and diseased canes, begin cutting the longer canes first and get them out of your way.  Pay close attention to what you are doing.  Work from the outside in.  Remember that you are surrounded with thorns so be very careful.

Cut above the leaf with five leaflets to about ¼ inch from the bud.  If longer, the cane can die back and if shorter, new growth might break off in the wind.  Cut to an outward facing bud so a new growth will face outward too.  With few exception, like roses that tend to grow sideways, cut in the direction you want the branch to grow.  Roses like The McCartney Rose, First Prize and Just Joey tend to sprawl so prune them to an inside facing bud.    Always remember to aim at an open space in the bush.  Make the cut on a slant so water drains off.  Seal with Elmer’s glue to prevent the cane borer from burrowing into the newly cut canes.

You also want to open the center of the bush for good air circulation to ward off diseases.  Cut long and straggly canes and canes that are crossing or touching each other leaving the stronger canes.  Leave three or four good healthy canes.  If only one cane is available, cut it lower to encourage new growth from the bud union.

On Hybrid Teas, Grandiflora, and some Floribundas, remove stems smaller than a pencil because they will not produce good blooms for cutting.  For exhibitors, cutting back to 6 to 12 inches length will produce stronger canes and good quality blooms.  Miniature roses are pruned the same way as Hybrid Teas.  If you find this too tedious, you can go drastic and use a hedge pruner and prune to 5” high.  Mother Nature is very forgiving and usually corrects our mistakes so don’t worry too much.

Remove all blind shoots.  These are branches that taper down to almost nothing.  Remove spurs.  These are short growths only a few inches long that have hardened off and taper down to a point.  They will not flower.

Prune to desired height you want for your rose.  Some rosarians want their roses tall.  I want my roses short and compact looking so I can look down on them instead of stretching my neck to appreciate their beauty. I usually cut to about a foot high except for the shrub types which can go from 18 inches to 24 inches tall.

After you are done pruning, remove every leaf.  These old leaves are the reservoir for black spot and mildew.  You might also want to start your spraying program with dormant oil to take care of the overwintering insects.  Also, spread a cupful of Epsom salt around each bush for better growth.  Then you can relax a little bit while waiting for the new growth to arrive.

Before and After Pruning

Rose Bush Before and After Puning.

 

Until next time. Stop and Smell the Roses.

Rosalinda, The Rose Lady

 

Rosalinda R Morgan

Author and Garden Writer

 

 

 

Scentimental

IMG_0868.JPG

Scentimental

‘Playboy’ x ‘Peppermint Twist’

Hybridizer – Carruth, 1997

 

This spicy scented floribunda was the first striped rose to win the AARS award. With burgundy and creamy white stripes on a vigorous plant with shiny, dark green foliage, Scentimental hardly needs its wonderful fragrance to attract attention, but that’s what made it an award winner in 1997. If you like the old fashioned type roses with its cup-shaped bloom, Scentimental is for you. The coloration is unique. It is disease resistant, hardy and has a strong fragrance. Bloom size is 4”-6” and is generous with its blooms. I had two in front of my old house and I planted two at my new home also.

 

Until next time, stop and smell the roses.

 

Rosalinda Morgan

 

Author and Garden Writer

 

 

 

 

 

Romantica Roses

Rouge Royale Regan Nursery

Rouge Royale – Photo courtesy of Regan Nursery

For rose lovers who want the charm and fragrance of the Old Garden Roses with their large variety of flower forms but longer blooming period, there are large selections now available. First, there was David Austin’s English Roses, then other growers started producing roses with the Old Garden Rose characteristics. One of them is the Meilland Company of France (developer of the famous Meidiland family of Landscape Roses. Alain Meilland of the legendary French rose company, the Meilland Company that boasts six generations of family ownership and hybridizer of the Romantica Roses received the Great Rosarians of the World award for 2012.

After David Austin’s success with the English Roses, the House of Meilland followed suit with a series of garden roses blending the best qualities of Heirlooms with modern Floribundas and Hybrid Teas. They call this group of rose Romantica Roses. Many of these varieties were bred in the South of France by Meilland International. These new French Roses represent an important expansion of the English Rose style, with astonishing new varieties and versatility that take the concept pioneered by David Austin to an entirely new level from romantic antique to modern Hybrid Teas, from climbers to shrubs with extensive color ranges, nostalgic pastels to vivid hues, wide selection of attractive plant forms, excellent disease resistance, outstanding foliage typical of the Meilland breeding line, old-fashioned fragrance and dependable repeat flowering habit for all seasons color. These characteristics appeal to both the novice as well as the advanced gardener. Their improved disease resistance and garden performance make them a wonderful addition to the modern landscape.

Here is a list of Romantica Roses that you can incorporate in your garden:

  1. Guy de Maupassant – F – Medium Pink – 1996
  2. Polka – LCl – Apricot Blend – 1996
  3. Michelangelo – HT – Medium Yellow – 1997
  4. Jean Giono – HT – Yellow Blend – 1998
  5. Francois Rabelais – F – Medium Red – 1998
  6. Traviata – HT – Dark Red – 1998
  7. Rouge Royal – HT – Red Blend – 2001
  8. Peter Mayle – HT – Deep Pink – 2003
  9. Bolero – F – White – 2004
  10. White Eden – LCl – White – 2004

The McCartney Rose

The McCartney Rose

(‘Nirvana’ x ‘Papa Meilland’) x ‘First Prize’

Hybridizer – Meilland, France, 1991

This heavily scented rose was originally named for Paul McCartney of “The Beatles” but Paul wanted it to be named in honor of his entire family whose favourite flower is the Rose.

The bloom is a very deep pink, starts high centered and then cupped as they mature. The blooms repeat very well all through the summer and into autumn. Its petal count is about 40. It has very dark, large and glossy leaves. It is a very vigorous plant and tall – reaching about 6- 7 ft. If left untamed, it will encroach on the neighboring plant – the canes grow sideways. The best place to grow it is in the corner of a bed where it can have more elbow room. “The McCartney Rose” is a very disease resistant rose and has a strong fragrance. Below are some of its awards:

  • Bagatelle Fragrance Prize 1988
  • Geneva Gold Medal 1988
  • Madrid Fragrance Prize 1988
  • Monza Gold Medal and Fragrance Prize 1988
  • Paris Gold Medal 1988
  • Belfast Fragrance Prize 1993
  • Durbanville Fragrance Prize 1993
  • Paris Fragrance Prize 1993