Abraham Darby

 

abraham-darby

Photo from David Austin Roses

Auscot – David Austin 1985

 

Abraham Darby is one of the most vigorous of all David Austin Roses.  Having heard from fellow rosarians that it bears long arching canes, I decided to plant it along a fence on the west side of my property in New York and let it spread out.  Abraham Darby is a well-rounded shrub which bears numerous, very large 5” across, very full (41+ petals), cluster-flowered, in small clusters, old fashioned, quartered bloom form, double cup-shaped flowers in shades of apricot becoming tinted with pink as they age.  Few roses make such a fine display or produce such magnificent blooms with glossy green foliage all through the season.  To encourage a better crop of flowers and help maintain its compact form, summer pruning is recommended.  The growth is vigorous and reliable and it repeats well.  Height is 5 ft. x 5 ft. or 8 ft. as a climber.

 

Abraham Darby is an outstanding rose with disease resistance, very prolific and continually blooming throughout the season.  I planted a pink clematis next to it and they complemented very nicely.  It has a rich, fruity fragrance with a refreshing sharpness.  Abraham Darby is named after one of the founding figures of the Industrial Revolution, who lived in Shropshire.

 

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.

Rosalinda Morgan, The Rose Lady

Author of “The Wentworth Legacy”

www.rosalindarmorgan.com

 

 

The Green Rose

Is there a pot of gold for us lovers of roses? For all the Irish in all of us and lovers of roses, let us think green, not a shamrock but a green rose. Not St. Patrick rose which only has a tint of green, but a real Green Rose.

 The Green Rose

 

At one of the meetings of the Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society, I won a unique rose called Viridiflora ‘Rosa Monstrosa’, otherwise known as Green Rose. Records say Green Rose has been in cultivation as early as 1743 and is a sport from Rosa Indica (The China Rose of England and the Daily Rose of America).

 

The Green Rose is a small plant that grows to 3’ tall and has few thorns. It can be grown in a pot, and is rarely out of “blooms”. The buds are small, oval, of soft bluish green color but unless you know what you’re looking for, it is hard to find the bud since the bush is totally green. The “blooms” are usually formed in clusters continually throughout the season and look wonderful. The petals of the bloom revert back to leaves (petals are modified leaves). The bloom does not have reproductive organs. As you would expect from an Old Garden Rose, Green Rose is fragrant too. It has a spicy fragrance. The Green Rose is an oddity and people either love it or hate it.

 

So for rose lovers, take pride. We have our own green to celebrate. It is a wonderful rose to use as a filler material in arrangements or as a landscape rose. But I’m sure some visitors to your garden will undoubtedly say “That’s not a rose.  You got to be kidding.” or worst yet, “That is the ugliest flower I’ve ever seen. Why do you give it space?” Because it is a great conversation piece to say the least. Plant it and you might like it. It is worth a try. Just as when you present your friend with a perfect red rose and they ask “Is that real?” I bet you this same person will tell you this rose is not real. But it is a real rose. The Green Rose is just that, a green rose.

 

“May the sun shine warm upon your face

And

May the rains fall softly upon your rose beds.”

 

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!!!

 

Contrary to popular belief, roses are not that difficult to grow. Why do you think Roses have been around for millions of years?  All they need are food, water and sunlight.  Just like you and me. If you supply their basic needs, you’ll be rewarded with beautiful and fragrant flowers like the Green Rose. Unlike other plants that only bloom once a year like azaleas, roses bloom all season long. If you keep on pruning them, you’ll get another bloom in 5-6 weeks.

If you have any questions on roses, ask the Rose Gardening World group on Facebook, they will share their rose knowledge with you. Here is the link:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/128765990560518/

Happy Rose Gardening!!! 

Scentimental

IMG_0868.JPG

Scentimental

‘Playboy’ x ‘Peppermint Twist’

Hybridizer – Carruth, 1997

 

This spicy scented floribunda was the first striped rose to win the AARS award. With burgundy and creamy white stripes on a vigorous plant with shiny, dark green foliage, Scentimental hardly needs its wonderful fragrance to attract attention, but that’s what made it an award winner in 1997. If you like the old fashioned type roses with its cup-shaped bloom, Scentimental is for you. The coloration is unique. It is disease resistant, hardy and has a strong fragrance. Bloom size is 4”-6” and is generous with its blooms. I had two in front of my old house and I planted two at my new home also.

 

Until next time, stop and smell the roses.

 

Rosalinda Morgan

 

Author and Garden Writer

 

 

 

 

 

FIREFIGHTER

FIREFIGHTER

Firefighter photo

Hyrbridizer: Orard, 1999

Var: ORAdal, Hacienda, Red ‘n’ Fragrant

Firefighter is a beautiful dark red hybrid tea which is the first of the nine roses to be named for the Remember Me Rose Gardens to honor the 343 firefighters who died on September 11, 2001 while trying to save lives in the World Trade Center. Firefighter also honors those men and women who risk their lives daily to protect ours.

Firefighter is a tall hybrid tea about 5-6 ft tall with a perfect flower form, about 4-6 inches and disease resistant. Petal count is about 40-45 and has a very strong fragrance. Firefighter won the City of Portland Gold Medal Award for 2007. I planted two Firefighter rose bushes, one on each side of my walkway and when they are in bloom, you can smell the sweet fragrance as you walk by. Right now, they are about 5 ft tall and full of blooms.

To honor and pay tribute to all the victims of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, an organization was formed by Sue Casey of Portland, Oregon to create three rose gardens on or near the sites of the terrorist attacks in New York, at the Pentagon and at a field in Stonycreek Township, Somerset County in Pennsylvania.

DICK CLARK

Dick Clark

DICK CLARK – 2015 ARS Members’ Choice Award

(‘Fourth of July’ x unknown); Introduction: Weeks Roses, 2011.

The American Rose Society Members’ Choice Award honors a rose receiving one of the highest national garden ratings in the annual Roses in Review survey, one that is widely grown, and one that does well in most parts of the country.

‘Dick Clark’, a red blend grandiflora, hybridized in 2009 by Tom Carruth & Christian Bedard has white flowers with a cherry pink edges blushing to all dark red. Blooms are 4-5 inches, borne mostly singly on long cutting stems with large, very clean, dark green, glossy foliage. It has moderate cinnamon fragrance. Prickles are almost straight, moderate, and golden tan. It is easy to grow, broadly rounded and the bushy plants have great vigor, disease resistance and quick repeat. It’s a great garden plant. ‘Dick Clark’ is an award winner: All-American Rose Selection 2011 and Rose Hills Rose Trials Gold Medal HT 2012. The 2014 Roses in Review gives it a garden rating of 7.8 and a show rating of 7.5.

Signature

Signature

Signature

Photo courtesy of Bob Sabin

Hybrid Tea

Var: JACnor

Hybridizer: Warriner

            ‘Signature’ is one of the top ten exhibition roses in the country since its introduction in 1996.  Its huge, high-centered blooms, 5 to 6 inches in diameter on a long stems about 18 inches long make it the favorite of exhibitors across the country.  The intense coloration of the bloom which is deep pink with cream at the bottom of the petals looks stunning.  It has sharply pointed buds which open into perfectly formed rose of 30 to 40 petals count, complemented with dark, thick leathery foliage.  Except for the fact that it has very light fragrance, it could be the rose you’ve been waiting for the exhibition table and garden display.  Plant it in the garden in a group of three with some blue perennial like salvia or dephinum and the effect is quite dazzling.

Rose de Rescht

Rose de Rescht 1

This compact Portland rose is a very reliable rebloomer.  It gives a big flush of tightly-formed rosette blooms in spring, pompon like and if you keep on deadheading it just keeps on blooming.  Fragrance is very strong.  Buds open in fuchsia-red color and fade into light lilac.  Rose de Rescht will tolerate some shade.  The only disease I find is rust but all I do is prune the stems that are affected and new healthy shoots appear.  Parentage is obscure, possibly Persian and discovery date is unknown but its recurring blooming qualities coupled with those old fashioned traits and its strong fragrance entitle this rose a place in any garden, large or small.

I planted lavender ‘Hidcote’ next ot it.  They complement each other in color and fragrance.  Since Rose de Rescht is a compact little rose, it is also a good specimen for container planting.  For history buffs, Rose de Rescht was believed to be growing at Castle Howard, in Yorkshire, England before the Second World War.